Will Smith says he was racially abused by police when growing up

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Will Smith says he was racially abused by police when growing up

Will Smith says he was racially abused by police when growing up in Philadelphia in the Eighties: 'I've been called n***** by the cops

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Will Smith says he was racially abused by police when growing up in Philadelphia in the Eighties: ‘I’ve been called n***** by the cops on more than 10 occasions’

  • The 51-year-old Bad Boys actor admitted he got stopped ‘frequently’ by officers 
  • He said cops used derogatory language towards him because of his skin colour 
  • ‘I grew up in Philadelphia. I grew up under Mayor Rizzo. He went from the chief of police to becoming the mayor, and he had an iron hand,’ the action star said during the podcast On One With Angela Rye 
  • ‘I’ve been called n***** by the cops in Philly on more than 10 occasions,’ he added 

Will Smith has been racially abused by police ‘on more than 10 occasions’.

The 51-year-old Bad Boys actor admitted he got stopped ‘frequently’ by officers in Philadelphia, who used derogatory language towards him because of his skin colour.

‘I grew up in Philadelphia. I grew up under Mayor Rizzo. He went from the chief of police to becoming the mayor, and he had an iron hand,’ the action star said during the podcast On One With Angela Rye. ‘I’ve been called n***** by the cops in Philly on more than 10 occasions.’

Challenging: Will Smith has been racially abused by police 'on more than 10 occasions'. The Bad Boys actor admitted he got stopped 'frequently' by officers in Philadelphia, who used derogatory language towards him because of his skin colour

Challenging: Will Smith has been racially abused by police ‘on more than 10 occasions’. The Bad Boys actor admitted he got stopped ‘frequently’ by officers in Philadelphia, who used derogatory language towards him because of his skin colour

His story: 'I grew up in Philadelphia. I grew up under Mayor Rizzo. He went from the chief of police to becoming the mayor, and he had an iron hand,' the action star said during the podcast On One With Angela Rye

His story: ‘I grew up in Philadelphia. I grew up under Mayor Rizzo. He went from the chief of police to becoming the mayor, and he had an iron hand,’ the action star said during the podcast On One With Angela Rye 

Smith added, ‘I got stopped frequently. So I understand what it’s like to be in those circumstances with the police.’

The 51-year-old star thinks the global Black Lives Matter protests are unprecedented and he’s pleased so many people have pledged their support to ending racism.

He said: ‘We are in a circumstance that we’ve never been in before. The entire globe has stood up and said to the African American people, “We see you and we hear you. How can we help?” We’ve never been there before.’

While Will can understand the anger many people feel about racism, he warned about the dangers of being ‘consumed’ by rage.

Tough upbringing: 'I've been called n***** by the cops in Philly on more than 10 occasions,' added the former rapper

Tough upbringing: ‘I’ve been called n***** by the cops in Philly on more than 10 occasions,’ added the former rapper

Young Will: Here the actor is seen in his yearbook photo from Overbrook High School

Young Will: Here the actor is seen in his yearbook photo from Overbrook High School

He said: ‘Rage is justified under oppression. But it also can be really dangerous.

‘You got to be careful not to be consumed by your own rage, and that’s something that I’ve worked really hard on.’

Instead, the Men In Black star thinks peaceful protests are the most powerful demonstration against oppression.

He said: ‘Peaceful protests put a mirror to the demonic imagery of your oppressor. And the more still you are in your peaceful protest, the more clear the mirror is for your oppressor — for the world to see and for them to see themselves.

‘I was really encouraged by how powerfully this generation was able to hold that mirror, and then the response of the world seeing and responding. I was deeply encouraged by the innate connectivity of the protesters, globally.’

However, while Will doesn’t think racism and prejudice will ever be completely eradicated, he hopes the next generation will use their votes and lead with love as they strive to make changes.

Early fame: In his 20s he became famous as part of the rap duo DJ Jazzy Jeff (aka Jeff Townes) And The Fresh Prince (aka Will Smith); seen in 1989 in New York City

Early fame: In his 20s he became famous as part of the rap duo DJ Jazzy Jeff (aka Jeff Townes) And The Fresh Prince (aka Will Smith); seen in 1989 in New York City

Changing times: The 51-year-old star thinks the global Black Lives Matter protests are unprecedented and he's pleased so many people have pledged their support to ending racism. He said: 'We are in a circumstance that we've never been in before. The entire globe has stood up and said to the African American people, "We see you and we hear you. How can we help?" We've never been there before.' Seen with his wife Jada Pinkett Smith in May 2019

Changing times: The 51-year-old star thinks the global Black Lives Matter protests are unprecedented and he’s pleased so many people have pledged their support to ending racism. He said: ‘We are in a circumstance that we’ve never been in before. The entire globe has stood up and said to the African American people, “We see you and we hear you. How can we help?” We’ve never been there before.’ Seen with his wife Jada Pinkett Smith in May 2019

He said: ‘Don’t succumb to lovelessness no matter how much evil you face, because [then] you poison yourself and you poison your own community.

‘I am pledging my unending devotion to the evolution of my community and the evolution of my country, and ultimately the world, towards the greatest harmony that we’ll be able to create.

‘I am happy to be alive during this time, and to serve.’

The future: However, while Will doesn't think racism and prejudice will ever be completely eradicated, he hopes the next generation will use their votes and lead with love as they strive to make changes. He said: 'Don't succumb to lovelessness no matter how much evil you face, because [then] you poison yourself and you poison your own community.' Jada with daughter Willow in 2016

The future: However, while Will doesn’t think racism and prejudice will ever be completely eradicated, he hopes the next generation will use their votes and lead with love as they strive to make changes. He said: ‘Don’t succumb to lovelessness no matter how much evil you face, because [then] you poison yourself and you poison your own community.’ Jada with daughter Willow in 2016

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