Rheumatoid arthritis treatment: The fast workout that may provide pain relief

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Rheumatoid arthritis treatment: The fast workout that may provide pain relief

Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the main causes of arthritis in the UK, with 400,000 people living with it. In rheumatoid arthritis, the body's immu

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Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the main causes of arthritis in the UK, with 400,000 people living with it. In rheumatoid arthritis, the body’s immune system targets affected joints, which leads to pain and swelling. According to the NHS, the joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis is usually a throbbing and aching pain.

What did Bye set out to achieve?

According to Bye, numerous studies show that high-intensity interval training is much more effective for improving endurance than moderate intensity training.

“This is true regardless if you’re sick or healthy, young or old. We wanted to see if patients with arthritis could handle high intensity training and see the same positive effects,” said Bye.

After ten weeks of hard training on a spinning bike twice a week, Bye saw no adverse effects on her study’s participants, a group of women with arthritis.

“Rather, we saw a tendency for there to be less inflammation, at least as measured by the inflammation marker CRP, and the participants of the study experienced a solid increase in maximum oxygen intake, meaning that they reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease,” Bye said.

The participants also saw a small reduction in BMI, body fat percent and waist measurement, as well as an increase in muscle mass as a result of the training period.

The participants warmed up for ten minutes at 70 per cent of their maximum pulse, and then did four repetitions of high intensity (85-95 percent of max pulse) four-minute intervals.

The break between each interval was about three minutes, at 70 percent of max pulse. The total work-out session lasted about 35 minutes.

“The women who participated in the study found this to be a good, effective method of training, and are mostly very motivated to continue because of the progress they’ve seen,” Bye concluded.

The NHS issues important advice when it comes to trying out different forms of exercise.

“If a particular activity causes your joints to become warm and swollen, or it causes severe pain, then stop and rest,” says the health body.

If it does not cause problems, then it is usually fine to continue, notes the health site.

It adds: “If a particular activity always causes a flare-up, it’s best to avoid it and find an alternative.”



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