Property news: Research reveals the worst regions to live in for bad neighbours

HomeLife & Style

Property news: Research reveals the worst regions to live in for bad neighbours

When it comes to buying a house, there are plenty of checks to put in place before you seal the deal, from getting in a surveyor to looking into an

High cholesterol: This surprising food could cause your ‘bad’ cholesterol levels to soar
Arthritis and tomatoes: Why are tomatoes bad for arthritis? Truth exposed
Charles Barkley: 'If people don't kneel, they're not a bad person'


When it comes to buying a house, there are plenty of checks to put in place before you seal the deal, from getting in a surveyor to looking into any structural issues. But there’s one thing you can only check once you’ve moved in – and that’s whether you’ll get on with the neighbours. Until you live somewhere for a while, there’s no way to know whether the people living next door will be a nightmare or not – but new research could give you a better idea.  

This was the lead problem in Northern England, which closely followed Wales as the second worst region for bad neighbours. 

A whopping 70 percent of residents admitted they’d had issues while living in the area, with 23 percent complaining about loud parties.

Unsurprisingly, 21 percent also said that loud music was to blame, while only 18 percent had worries about being slack with garden maintenance. 

South West England was just one point behind, with 69 percent of people revealing they’d argued with the people living next door. 

However, as well as noise and wild parties being an issue, the southwestern region also found parking problems to be one of the main causes of arguments. 

Almost a quarter of those surveyed in the area said that their neighbours often park on their driveway or in their spot. 

Those in the South East were most likely to complain about noise as well as people putting rubbish in their bins, but on the whole Scotland was the region with the lowest number of incidents between grumpy neighbours. 

Only 60 percent of those in Scotland said they’d had a row with their neighbours, with 27 percent citing loud music as the biggest culprit. 

 

However, Scottish homeowners also had a much more traditional issue on their list, with a fifth moaning that the people living next door wouldn’t pay for their half of the garden fence. 

Commenting on the research findings, Nima Ghasri, director at Good Move said: “It’s interesting to see just how many people have had disputes with their neighbours across the UK and the factors that caused these arguments.

“If you’re experiencing issues with your neighbour, I’d always advise to try and discuss the problem with your neighbour first. 

“If you’re worried about approaching them, maybe write a letter and explain the problem clearly. 

“If, however, the problems become serious, I’d recommend making a formal complaint to your local council.”



COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0