Car insurance experts warn new technology has ‘legal issues’ which could see drivers fined

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Car insurance experts warn new technology has ‘legal issues’ which could see drivers fined

Car insurance firms are hesitant in accepting the new technology for fear of liability issues but have also warned drivers could face extra fines i

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Car insurance firms are hesitant in accepting the new technology for fear of liability issues but have also warned drivers could face extra fines if they rely on the technology. Experts at Thatcham Research have warned the technology would not focus on UK roads meaning some vital elements may be missed.

Mr Avery has also warned the technology may not be able to avoid debris on the road surface, pedestrians or deep water.

Thatcham’s report has also called for driving laws to be amended to deal with secondary tasks such as using a mobile phone.

It is currently an offence to use a device while behind the wheel but there has been no further guidance on what could happen with driverless cars.

Passengers are currently able to use secondary devices inside a car but this could be too distracting for drivers.

Thatcham’s report has previously warned that secondary tasks must be limited to those available through the vehicle infotainment screen.

Automated lane keeping systems automatically take control of a vehicle under some conditions to keep cars stable while driving.

A review by the Department for Transport (DfT) will ask industry experts to consider whether the new tool makes cars an automated vehicle.

Analysis by Thatcham’s in their Defining Safe Automated Driving report says automated vehicles are defined as when a driver is effectively a passenger.

Their definition of an automated car is when road users have no ability to control a vehicle apart from a mode change.

If road users are considered passengers in their vehicle then it could be down to manufacturers to settle fines.

This makes clarity on this element vital to ensure that the role of drivers is clear from the outset.

Following the approval of the system by the United Nations, the technology is set to be introduced to UK cars from Spring 2021.

The DfT review will also look at whether any new driving laws need to be introduced to enable the technology to be launched safely.

It will also consider whether the tool can be used at speeds of up to 70mph across the UK road network.



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