BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Da Vinci Code is heading from page to stage 

HomeTv & Show

BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Da Vinci Code is heading from page to stage 

BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Da Vinci Code is heading from page to stageBy Baz Bamigboye for the Daily Mail Published: 01:57 BST, 26 June 2020 |

BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Panto is in danger… Oh yes it is!
BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Toheeb Jimoh spends entire quarantine 'doing absolutely nothing' but playing FIFA
Kingsman and Co are hot on the heels of Bond, says BAZ BAMIGBOYE


BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Da Vinci Code is heading from page to stage

The clues were tough to decipher but once unravelled, they led to a startling discovery.

Dan Brown’s enormously successful book The Da Vinci Code, which has sold 100 million copies — and counting — since it was published 17 years ago, is bound for the UK stage, with a world premiere national tour starting in the spring.

Responding to my enquiries with a statement, Brown said he’s ‘incredibly excited’ to see the novel ‘I poured my heart into almost 20 years ago … go from page to the stage’.

Fans may remember that Brown’s tome opens at the Louvre, where an albino monk grapples in a fight to the death with an art curator. A Caravaggio painting is involved.

Tom Hanks starred as Robert Langdon and Audrey Tautou played Sophie Neveu in Ron Howard's 2006 film adaptation of the novel

Tom Hanks starred as Robert Langdon and Audrey Tautou played Sophie Neveu in Ron Howard’s 2006 film adaptation of the novel

Soon, we meet Brown’s protagonists: Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbolism — a sort of brainbox Indiana Jones — and whip-smart French police cryptologist Sophie Neveu. 

Together, the pair charge across Europe on a quest to decode the meaning of a series of cryptic anagrams and numerical clues.

The dashing Professor Langdon is described as ‘Harrison Ford in Harris tweed’ — though it was Tom Hanks who played him in the 2006 film version, which also starred Audrey Tautou as Neveu.

The 2006 adaptation grossed $758million at the box office, becoming the second-highest grossing film worldwide in 2006

The 2006 adaptation grossed $758million at the box office, becoming the second-highest grossing film worldwide in 2006

Fans may remember that Brown’s tome opens at the Louvre, when an albino monk grapples in a fight to the death with an art curator

Fans may remember that Brown’s tome opens at the Louvre, when an albino monk grapples in a fight to the death with an art curator

Together, the pair charge across Europe on a quest to decode the meaning of a series of cryptic anagrams and numerical clues

Together, the pair charge across Europe on a quest to decode the meaning of a series of cryptic anagrams and numerical clues

The cast for the stage adaptation, by Rachel Wagstaff and Duncan Abel, has not been settled yet, though director Luke Sheppard told me he and producer Simon Friend have begun the process of looking for ‘two extraordinary actors’ to play the adventurous experts.

Friend has also brought stage designer David Woodhead and video guru Andrzej Goulding on board.

Sheppard said the key is not to try to replicate the Hollywood blockbuster. ‘We’re not being lured into that trap,’ he said. ‘We’re aiming to be inventive and innovative.’

He cited, as an example, the breakneck car chase through Paris featured in both the book and the film. 

‘We can’t compete with that,’ he said. 

It is unclear who will reprise the roles of Langdon and Neveu as the cast for the stage adaptation, by Rachel Wagstaff and Duncan Abel, has not been settled yet. The pair is seen above with Sir Leigh Teabing, played by Sir Ian McKellen, in the 2006 adaptation

It is unclear who will reprise the roles of Langdon and Neveu as the cast for the stage adaptation, by Rachel Wagstaff and Duncan Abel, has not been settled yet. The pair is seen above with Sir Leigh Teabing, played by Sir Ian McKellen, in the 2006 adaptation

Dan Brown (above) said he’s ‘incredibly excited’ to see the novel ‘I poured my heart into almost 20 years ago ... go from page to the stage’

Dan Brown (above) said he’s ‘incredibly excited’ to see the novel ‘I poured my heart into almost 20 years ago … go from page to the stage’

Instead, he and the designers have come up with an ingenious way of doing it theatrically.

Sheppard said he and Woodhead met up in a park last week — respecting lockdown rules — so the designer could show him a cardboard model of the set. 

‘We sat on a bench and I studied it from a distance,’ he said.

Friend told me that the ‘succinct’ two-hour show (the ponderous movie ran close to three hours!) will embark on a 33-week tour, kicking off at the Churchill Theatre, Bromley, on April 3.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 1