Amy Schumer 'can't ever be pregnant again' after IVF and is 'holding off' on surrogacy plans

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Amy Schumer 'can't ever be pregnant again' after IVF and is 'holding off' on surrogacy plans

'I can't ever be pregnant again': Amy Schumer, 39, reveals she's no longer undergoing IVF after painful struggle to give son Gene a si

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‘I can’t ever be pregnant again’: Amy Schumer, 39, reveals she’s no longer undergoing IVF after painful struggle to give son Gene a sibling… and is ‘holding off’ on surrogacy plans

  • Amy Schumer, 39 has revealed she is no longer undergoing IVF treatment in a bid to provide her one-year-old son Gene with a sibling
  • Earlier this year, Schumer revealed how she was freezing her eggs and ‘figuring out what to do’ in terms of having another child
  • The comic has said on Sunday Today with Willie Geist that she ‘can’t ever be pregnant again’ and is holding off on surrogacy plans 
  • Schumer suffered tremendously during her first pregnancy from hyperemesis gravidarum and had a difficult Cesarean section due to endometriosis 

Amy Schumer has revealed she has no immediate plans to expand her brood after suffering tremendously throughout her first pregnant with one-year-old son Gene.

Earlier this year, Schumer revealed how was undergoing IVF treatment in an effort to provide a sibling for her child and that she was freezing her eggs and ‘figuring out what to do.’ 

But in a new interview set to air this weekend on Sunday Today with Willie Geist, the 39-year-old comic admits: ‘We did IVF and IVF was really tough on me,’ adding: ‘I don’t think I could ever do IVF again.’

'I can't ever be pregnant again': Amy Schumer, 39, says she has chosen not to undergo further IVF treatment after painful struggle to conceive again... on Sunday Today with Willie Geist

‘I can’t ever be pregnant again’: Amy Schumer, 39, says she has chosen not to undergo further IVF treatment after painful struggle to conceive again… on Sunday Today with Willie Geist

Schumer shares 15-month-old son Gene David with her chef husband Chris Fischer, 40, and has previously spoken about her struggles to get pregnant, revealing that they were left with one embryo after a first round of IVF treatment. 

The Trainwreck star has even said that she and husband Fischer have accepted the fact they might just have the one child. ‘I decided that I can’t be pregnant ever again,’ she said in a clip obtained by PEOPLE.

She added: ‘We thought about a surrogate. but I think we’re going to hold off for right now.’

Family matters: Schumer shares 15-month-old son Gene David with her chef husband Chris Fischer, 40, and has previously spoken about her struggles to get pregnant

Family matters: Schumer shares 15-month-old son Gene David with her chef husband Chris Fischer, 40, and has previously spoken about her struggles to get pregnant

In January, she shared a picture of her bruised and swollen lower abdomen, featuring a red and angry looking Cesarean section scar, captioning the post: ‘I’m a week into IVF and feeling really run down and emotional. 

‘If anyone went through it and if you have any advice or wouldn’t mind sharing your experience with me please do.’

Schumer suffered debilitating hyperemesis gravidarum throughout her pregnancy, with daily bouts of vomiting so bad they left her often bedridden and dehydrated, and at times hospitalised.

'I'm run down and emotional': Amy Schumer revealed she was undergoing IVF in bid to give son a sibling in January... and shared picture of bruised tummy and C-section scar

‘I’m run down and emotional’: Amy Schumer revealed she was undergoing IVF in bid to give son a sibling in January… and shared picture of bruised tummy and C-section scar

She also suffers from endometriosis, which caused surgeons issues during her Cesarean section.

Speaking on Dr. Berlin’s Informed Pregnancy podcast, Amy said: ‘I was throwing up through the whole first hour of my C-section. It’s supposed to take about an hour and a half or something but mine took over three hours because of my endometriosis.’ 

In a bid to make life easier for other moms, she also recently talked about how she decided not to breastfeed her son.

New baby: Amy shared this picture with her husband and their newborn, after his birth

New baby: Amy shared this picture with her husband and their newborn, after his birth

Speaking on the Informed Pregnancy and Parenting podcast, she said she couldn’t get her son to latch on, so tried pumping her milk.

‘I wanted him to get the colostrum,’ she said, referring to the antibody rich substance a mother makes shortly after birth.

‘We had a lactation expert come over. He didn’t latch and I just didn’t feel that push to make that happen. Then I pumped for like the first month. Then I was like, ‘Not for me.’ This is not for me and I didn’t want to do it.

‘Some people just absolutely love it and I’m so happy for them, and it was just bumming me out. But then I was also kind of proud doing it and whatever and getting him the milk and stuff. Then once it occurred to me that I could stop. I was like, ‘I’m going to stop’ … And then, every week what I did was just took away one session of the pumping.’

How does IVF work?

In-vitro fertilisation, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already-fertilised egg inserted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples are unable to conceive naturally, and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue as normal.

The procedure can be done using eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors.

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that IVF should be offered on the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle reducing as they age.

Around eight million babies are thought to have been born due to IVF since the first ever case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

Chances of success

The success rate of IVF depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if it’s known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy.

IVF isn’t usually recommended for women over the age of 42 because the chances of a successful pregnancy are thought to be too low.

Between 2014 and 2016 the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 per cent for women under 35

23 per cent for women aged 35 to 37

15 per cent for women aged 38 to 39

9 per cent for women aged 40 to 42

3 per cent for women aged 43 to 44

2 per cent for women aged over 44

 

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