Steve Jobs Blasts Apple As A ‘struggling’ Brand In Rare Unearthed Speech

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STEVE JOBS blasts Apple as a “struggling” firm in a newly-unearthed lecture delivered to a roomful of MIT students in 1992.

The 72-minute talk is available in its entirety on YouTube – but for those who don’t have the attention span to sit through it, we’ve rounded up the best bits.

MIT Steve Jobs was clealy still stinging from his split with Apple when he gave the talk

Jobs on his divorce from Apple

Steve Jobs delivered the lecture during the time when he had been forced out of Apple, the company he founded out of his garage, and it’s safe to say he ripped his former firm apart.

By this point he’d already moved on to launch NeXT: a rival computer and software manufacturer.

Addressing his messy departure from Apple in the clip, Jobs said: “I think everybody lost”.

“Apple has been struggling the last few years,” he added.

“They’ve been having a real struggle with who they want to be. There were two camps within Apple. Camp 1 wanted to be the serious computer company and Camp 2 wanted to sort of be the Sony of computers.

“That struggling was somewhat tearing Apple apart, and fortunately the Sony guys won. They’re abdicating, and basically not putting a lot of resources into the power users on desktops. And I think they’ll do very well at that.”

Jobs on Apple’s future

The Apple founder also talked about the hurdles in making new technologies portable, including achieving the levels of speed that the public expected from these gadgets.

“I think there’s some tremendous opportunities to give them some solutions,” he said.

MIT Jobs also picked on budding consultants in the audience.

Fast forward a decade after the 1992 lecture, and Jobs (now back in the driving seat at Apple), would deliver on those opportunities in the form of the iPod.

And six years after that he would introduce the era of the modern smartphone with the launch of the iPhone in 2007.

Jobs hated consultants

Known for being a straight-talker, Jobs doesn’t hold back his distaste for consultants.

After discovering that some members of the audience were in consulting, he exclaimed: “Oh, that’s bad. A mind is too important to waste.”

“The only consultants I’ve seen that I think are truly useful are the ones who help us sell our computers,” Jobs added.

“But other than that I don’t think there’s anything inherently evil in consulting.




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